Cadillac Cimarron

Based on the GM J platform, the Cadillac Cimarron was introduced in 1982. It continued to be sold through 1988. Cadillac has not typically missed the mark on what drivers were looking to own, and yet they really missed the mark on this model – by a long shot. The Cimarron was one of the company's least successful models, and consequently its economy car roots tarnished Cadillac's image of prestige. Car and Driver wrote that director John Howell of Cadillac has a picture of the Cimarron on his wall captioned, "Lest we forget". The company would in fact be very pleased if consumers would forget that they ever offered the vehicle to begin with, although, it is important to remember that even great companies make mistakes from time to time. The 1975 Cadillac Seville was intended to compete with the Mercedes-Benz luxury cars, although it did nothing of the sort. Some have blamed the economic situation at the time for the failure, but that is really not the case. In reality, consumers where looking for something smaller and this was just not it. CAFE – Corporate Average Fuel Economy requirements, did hit Cadillac. Such requirements from the U.S. federal government severely penalized manufacturers if their fleet average fuel economy dropped below the minimum standard. Another excuse that has been repeated was the success of imported compacts from BMW, Mercedes-Benz, and Audi. In an effort to compete with the new models of the other manufacturers, Cadillac rushed the Cimarron into production early. This was a lazy move and the Cadillac paid the consequences. It resulted in the smallest and least-distinguished Cadillac model produced to date. This is just another example that you can cut a diamond, but you cannot polish a turd. It seems as though Cadillac would have been better off to let the car go all together, for at least they would still have their positive reputation.