Buick Estate Wagon

Station wagons have often been conversation pieces and it is only appropriate the Buick would offer one called the Estate. This was the name placed on all their full-size station wagons. The year 1940 was a special year in that the first estate wagon was first offered on the 1940 Super model. Amazingly, it used a wooden body and was available on Buick's larger "C" series in the later 1946 through 1953 models. Post World War II, the baby boom raised the desire for the roomy station wagon, and the Roadmaster added an Estate trim in the 1950s. Unfortunately, they were no longer made of wood, yet they still contained the iconic wood side panels as an honor to the wagon's legacy. The 1953 Roadmaster Estate Wagon was sadly the last to use real wood on its exterior body panels. It was reintroduced on the "B" body again in 1970 and was simply called Estate Wagon until 1977. Later on the LeSabre Estate Wagon and Electra Estate Wagon were made available as well. The last Estates to be offered were rear wheel drive B-bodies with a 115.9 in wheelbase. In 1988 and 1989, the Electra Estate model name was used again even though the Electra sedan used the front wheel drive C platform. Like all good things, the Estate came in an end in 1990, at which time it was just called the Estate. In 1991 the Estate was replaced with the B-body Roadmaster Estate Wagon, and don't be confused, although it did use the "Estate" name, it is more commonly referred to, simply as the "Roadmaster". However, if drivers knew the whole history of the model's name, they may start to honor it with the title, "Estate" once again. No matter what though, families are definitely smaller today than they were back in the beginning of the Estate automobile, and it is unlikely that it will ever again see the popularity that it saw back then.