Audi 100

Between 1968 and 1994, Audi manufactured the 100, a mid-sized automobile. Audi faced some tough press right from the start with CBS News claiming the vehicle was unsafe. Thankfully, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration cleared the vehicle shortly thereafter. The C3 model of the 100 was sold in the United States as the Audi 5000 until 1988 and was the unlucky model caught in the safety story. The press was introduced to the Audi 100 on November 26, 1968, at which point the vehicle denoted a power output of 100 PS. Volkswagen revived the Audi brand in 1965 and the Audi 100 was the largest car to be released after this revival. Drivers had a number of variations to choose between: of the C1 platform came the Audi 100 (two- and four-door sedans), and the Audi 100 Coupe S, which was a flashy fastback car. The C2 platform was launched in 1976 with an unusual five-cylinder engine and crisper styling. The initial model offered a 100 bhp (74 kW) engine with "5 cylinder power and 4 cylinder economy", and was later upgraded to 136 bhp (100 kW). Sadly, the Coupe was discontinued and replaced by a five-door hatchback model. Although, many would argue that the hatchback was not an adequate replacement for the coupe. Following, the 100 Avant was launched as part of this same generation, at which time two- and four-door models continued. Consumers in the United States will recognize the Audi 100 as the Audi 5000, which was done in an attempt to re-brand the car and avoid association with the C1. It was essentially a sales success that allowing Audi to spread research and development costs over a much wider customer base than Europe-only competitors. The Audi 100 successfully edged out the Ford Sierra as Car of the Year in Europe in 1983.