AMC Javelin

In an attempt to rival other similar cars of the era such as the Ford Mustang and Chevrolet Camaro, American Motors Corporation released the Javelin, a "pony car" in 1968, and production continued until 1974. The debut of the Javelin in 1968 was welcomed and showcased around the United States during the 1966 AMX project tour. The Javelin was available in a plethora of AMC engines from an economical 232 in<sup>3</sup> straight-6 through three V8s. An additional "Go Package" was available with a 4-barrel carbureted 343 cu in (5.6 L) V8. The driver of such a car was also delighted to have power front disc brakes, dual exhausts, and wide tires. The special additions did not end there – a "Big Bad" paint option featuring brilliant blue, orange and green colors and the "Big bad Javelin" included a curious roof spoiler. The reviews for the model were favorable, with Road & Track comparing the Javelin positively to its competitors on its introduction in 1968. The lack of a "big, heavy, super-powerful engine" turned out to be an asset in such a small vehicle, and earned it the title of "pleasant". Nevertheless, there were a few negative aspects to the Javelin; particularly, the non-power steering in the "quick-steering" option received poor marks, along with the disc/drum brakes. Some even complained about interior features and described them as dull or bland. The Javelin was never really given a fair shake, because many in the automotive industry never really took to AMC cars in general. As a result, the Javelin does not command the high prices of other similar muscle and pony car models. Yet, for those consumers who could see past the AMC name, it was well sold, and in fact, it regularly outsold both the Plymouth Barracuda and Dodge Challenger, which are still popular today.