The cool thing about the city of Atlanta is that it sits almost right in the middle of the state of Georgia, and since its founding has been a major rail and transportation hub servicing much of the Deep South. During the American Civil War Atlanta was a valuable strategic objective for Union commanders; the rail depots in and around Atlanta helped bring much-needed supplies to Confederate soldiers until its capture by Union forces in 1864. Today the city of Atlanta remains a center of transportation and commerce in the entire region, and is home to over 542,000 residents, though its surrounding metro area has a population ten times that, a testament to Atlanta’s growth and prosperity over the years.

As we mentioned, Atlanta is one of the easier Deep South cities to transport vehicles to and from. It helps that several major interstates run through it, including I-75, the main north-south interstate that runs through the areas west of the Appalachian Mountains and runs into Michigan and finally into Canada. I-20 is the main east-west interstate and runs pretty far west, allowing carriers to run routes that start in Atlanta or Savannah and head west , servicing much of the southern states in the process. Transporting to Atlanta is usually going to be fairly well-priced, even in the winter, as winter weather is not nearly as bad in Atlanta as it is in, say, Detroit, much further north.